Lisbiz strategies: Incivility can lead to a hostile environment

Home Columns Lisbiz strategies: Incivility can lead to a hostile environment

June 11/18, 2018: Volume 33, Issue 26

By Lisbeth Calandrino

 

While a training program on workplace manners and courtesy may seem like overkill, the reality is this: Rudeness is an epidemic costing industries millions a year. For nearly two decades, Christine Porath, acclaimed business professor at Georgetown University, has studied and observed a sharp rise in rudeness, emotional harassment, bullying and other toxic behaviors that can cost companies financially and employees their health and well-being.

Civility represents social norms and rules that must be followed to positively and productively relate to others. More than ever before, people are feeling disrespected at work. Employees feel they’re working in a toxic culture with insensitive managers and being treated disrespectfully based on gender, race or religion.

Oftentimes, this incivility leads to more serious forms of harassment. All incidents of harassment require employers or managers to respond quickly and appropriately. If issues are left unaddressed, a hostile work environment can develop, which can expose employers to further complaints and lawsuits. What society seems to be gaining in terms of both knowledge and technological advancement, it’s losing out on basic social values that directly impact the bottom line.

To address the growing problem of incivility, a company must make it a top priority. Everyone must understand the concept of civility, its importance to a company as well as its typical causes and effects.

Skills needed to effectively practice civil behavior, as well as different ways organizations can systematize civility in the workplace, need to be discussed. The benefits to civility in the workplace are countless and will pay off immensely in every aspect.

When Porath asked people in one survey why they were uncivil, more than 25% blamed their organization for not providing them with the basic skills they needed, such as listening and giving feedback. If your employees aren’t behaving well, and you’ve already gone through the trouble of hammering home the organization’s civility message, ask yourself, “Have I also equipped them to succeed?”

Don’t assume everyone instinctively knows how to be civil. When coaching employees, focus on helping them learn to listen, give and receive feedback, work across differences and deal with difficult people. Don’t just impart information; be explicit about your organization’s values.

Make civility a part of your mission statement, posting it somewhere visible. Engage your team in a dialogue about what your norms should be, then make it clear to your employees they need to hold their managers and colleagues accountable for living up to your norms of civility. Be explicit about your organization’s values.

One great reason to practice civility, you’ve heard this before—no man is an island. No matter how talented or indispensable you are to your business, you need to rely on suppliers and other people to get things done.

It’s worth noting—civility goes beyond good manners.

Lisbeth Calandrino has been promoting retail strategies for the last 20 years. To have her speak at your business or to schedule a consultation, contact her at lcalandrino@nycap.rr.com.

Must Read

Tarkett to host NeoConnect events

Solon, Ohio—As NeoCon 2020 moves online, Tarkett said it will participate in the virtual design conference by hosting a series of online events to...

Housing poised to lead U.S. economic recovery

By Ken Ryan All recessions are not created equal, and neither are the roads to recovery. Whereas a decade ago housing was seen as the...

How to successfully sell underlayment at retail

By Megan Salzano Underlayment is often the unsung hero of a flooring installation. It might not be the most glamorous of products, but without it...

Mohawk to host virtual NeoConnect summit

Mohawk announced a new event it will host as part of NeoCon's digital hub, NeoConnect. The virtual summit is described as a one-of-a-kind interactive...

Long Island contractors are #Ready2GoSafely

By Reginald Tucker The Long Island region of New York was among the last few areas of the country to begin reopening—in a state that...

FloorTek Expo 2020 canceled

Dalton—​​The American Floorcovering Alliance (AFA) announced the cancellation of the FloorTek Expo 2020, which was scheduled to be held here September 29 and 30....

As seen in

Volume 33, Issue 26

DOWNLOAD
X